Coach-Parent Partnership

Gymnastics & Parenting Articles

Coach-Parent Partnership

By Positive Coaching Alliance
Following are guidelines for how sports parents can contribute to a Coach-Parent Partnership that benefits youth athletes.

The Second-Goal Parent

By Positive Coaching Alliance
A Second-Goal Parent recognizes that there is a Little Picture and a Big Picture in youth sports. The Little Picture concerns things like whether the child is playing the right position, the team is winning, etc. The Big Picture, which often gets drowned out by the Little Pictures, is about what the child is learning from youth sports.

Video: Sports Parents Need To Address Kids Needs, Not The Other Way Around

By Positive Coaching Alliance
AJ Johnson discusses the role that parents play in the student-athlete experience. As a sports parent himself, Johnson’s biggest frustration with other sports parents is putting added pressure on to a kid when it’s time for their kid to compete

What Parents Need to Know About Sports Physicals

By TrueSport
When your athlete comes home from school with a paper requiring a doctor’s sign-off before they can start the season, getting them in for the sports physical can feel like a chore. But really, the pre-participation sports physical is an opportunity for your child’s primary care physician to catch any underlying problems, check in with your athlete, and make an honest assessment about their readiness for play.

Stress Better: How Parents Can Help Athletes Grow from Stress

By TrueSport
Stress automatically calls to mind negative moments in life: A difficult upcoming test, a fight with a friend or parent, global collective stress like the coronavirus pandemic, or even self-created stress about what others might be thinking. And yes, too much stress and too few resources to combat it can be a bad thing…but allowing kids to entirely avoid it actually does them a disservice.

Why Do Some Athletes Struggle with Body Image?

By TrueSport
Body image issues in athletes can come from a wide variety of sources: certain sports value specific weights and body types more than others, athletes will deal with puberty in different ways, and some student athletes struggle with control in other areas of their lives, which can lead to body image issues and unhealthy behaviors around food and exercise.

All-Day Events: Top 6 Foods to Avoid When You’re In Charge of the Team’s Snacks

By TrueSport
As a parent of a young athlete, you’re likely going to be on snack duty at some point during the season. For some competitions or practices, this will be easier. But for longer days, you may be asked to provide meals or snacks to keep athletes satiated from breakfast to dinner. Here are a few foods to avoid bringing — and what to bring instead.

Is Your Athlete Drinking Enough? 7 Things Sports Parents Need to Know (PDF)

By David Benzel
If proper hydration for your athlete is not HIGH on your radar, then dehydration is a strong possibility. In fact, Dr. Susan Yeargin – an expert at the University of South Carolina – conducted research on this topic and found out something that every youth sports coach and parent needs to know. Up to 75% of young athletes go to practice ALREADY dehydrated.

3 Tips on Building a Powerful College Recruiting Mission Statement

By Tom Kovic
College coaches are brilliant recruiters and look for 3 key components when evaluating prospects.

5 Strategies to Help Your Athlete Manage Performance and Social Anxiety

By TrueSport
Every athlete will likely feel some kind of nerves during practices or in competition. Some athletes thrive under pressure and embrace the nerves, while others will crumple if not bolstered by a supportive coach and team.